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How Christian is Britain?

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British Prime minister David Cameron.

By Hassan isilow
This week British Prime Minister David Cameron said the United Kingdom was a Christian country and citizens should not be afraid to say so. Cameron’s statements have generated much discussion across the world, with some blaming him for using religion to score political goals.
However, members of minority faiths fear the premier’s statements might have suggested that their religions do not matter any more in Britain, because it serves to downplay their importance. This pushes many to ask if Cameron is now preaching religion and politics, or church and state. In 2005, then British Premier Tony Blair said religion should not play the same role in British politics as it does in America. Blair made this statement while speaking to church leaders, interfaith representatives and community activists in London about his vision for the role of faith in the UK.
Six years later, Cameron expresses a view that is almost diametrically opposed, publicly defending the role of religion in politics, saying that the Bible in particular, was crucial to British values. According to the official website of the British monarch, the Sovereign holds the title as “Defender of the Faith and Supreme Governor of the Church of England”.
There are many examples of the relationship between the established church and the state. Archbishops and bishops are appointed by the Queen on the advice of the Prime Minister, who considers the names selected by a Church Commission. They take an oath of allegiance to the Queen on appointment and may not resign without Royal authority.
I don’t believe it matters much if Britain is a “Christian country” or not. What is important, however, is that the British state should guarantee all citizens the right to freely exercise their religion – whatever it may be, thus assuring minority faiths a right to existence. Despite the growing anti-Muslim sentiment in Europe, the four million Muslims in Britain still enjoy many privileges.
So there is no need for them to challenge Cameron’s statements. After all, unlike France and many of its neighbours, Britain has not banned the niqab (Muslim face veil). Neither has Britain banned the construction of minarets, as Switzerland had done. Christianity has been the main religion in the United Kingdom dating back to 1,400 years. Many Britons identify themselves with Christianity.
I guess Christianity is more like a culture to the British, as opposed to a religion. By contrast, minority faiths like Islam, Judaism, Hinduis, among others were brought to Britain by migrants. Therefore, given the fact that Christians remain the majority in Britain, there is northing wrong with the premier declaring UK as a Christian country. After all Saudi Arabia, Iran, Bahrain and others openly declare themselves to be Muslim countries, either because of a large Muslim population or for historic reasons, such as the presence of the Kaabah, Islam’s holiest site in Mecca.
It is also important to acknowledge that members of minority faiths enjoy more freedoms living in Britain and other Western countries – including South Africa – compared to countries known to be the Muslim heartland. Thus, I believe it is more important to respect the values and culture of a majority people in our community without compromising our own. Such differences of faith in our midst are a great motivator for peaceful living and tolerance.

Written by africawitness

December 21, 2011 at 10:19 am

Posted in Xenophobia

Saharawi appeals for African support

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Mr. B .A El Mami Counselor General of the republic of Saharawi in South Africa

By Hassan Isilow
The republic of Saharawi has asked the African civil society to support them in the fight against human rights violations being committed by the Moroccan government against its people in the Western Sahara.
This appeal was made by Mr. B .A El Mami Counselor General of the republic of Saharawi in South Africa, while speaking to Africa witness in an exclusive interview.
‘‘We appeal to civil society organisations in Africa to help us in the campaign against human rights violations instigated by the Moroccan Government on innocent civilians in the Western Sahara’’ the diplomat appealed.
He said hundreds of Saharawi citizens had gone missing, and he believes they could have been killed while in Moroccan prisons.
Human rights organisations have previously reported that most people detained in Moroccan Prisons were tortured and maltreated in overcrowded spaces.
The Moroccan government has been illegally occupying the Western Sahara for many years, which has made some analysts to compare Israel’s Occupation of Palestine to the current situation in Saharawi.

Written by africawitness

December 8, 2011 at 2:06 pm

Posted in Xenophobia

Scholars examine Afro-Arab relations

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By Hassan Isilow

African scholars are trying to bridge the current gap between North-Africa which is predominately Arab and the rest of the continent, through research aimed at regional integration.
This was revealed during the launch of a book entitled Regional Integration in Africa: Bridging the North – Sub-Saharan Divide. Published by the Africa Institute of South Africa, which is in the forefront of this campaign.
“This book came as a result of a research project conducted by the Africa Institute of South Africa. It examines the North African countries strategies of involvement with the rest of the continent and their integration initiatives,” said Dr .Matlotleng Matlou, Chief Executive Officer of the Africa Institute of South Africa.
Speaking at the launch of the book held at the Department of Science and Technology head offices in Pretoria, editor of the book, Dr Hamdy A Hassan, Professor of Political Science at Zayed University in Dubai, explained that the book tried to examine why there was a gap between the predominantly Arab North Africa and the rest of the continent.
Hassan believes the book will help many policy makers and academics on the continent to understand causes for the divide and address them appropriately. According to Hassan, the book looked at major issues involving Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco and Mauritania. “These countries, in most cases, have been treated as separate from sub-Saharan Africa. However, the historical interests indicate that the North African countries have been and still are closely connected with the rest of the African continent,” he said.
Representatives from the embassies of Brazil, Chad, China, Democratic Republic of Congo, Egypt, Germany, Kenya, Mauritania, Romania, Sudan, Senegal, Swaziland, Saharawi and Venezuela participated in an open discussion debating the contents of the book and its relevance to the current political climate in North Africa and the rest of the continent.
The book consists of two parts with the first five chapters written in English, while the last six chapters are written in Arabic.

Written by africawitness

December 8, 2011 at 1:30 pm

Posted in Xenophobia

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